Archive: Aug 2013

Proper Hurricane Season Preparedness

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hurricaneAs summer comes to an end and fall arrives, hurricane season comes along with it. While we can’t know what lies ahead, we do know that hurricanes of some sort are to be expected, and the best thing we can do is be prepared.

When Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc along the northeast, devastating towns and cities, most people weren’t mentally or physically prepared for how bad it would be—countless people lost their homes, businesses, and more. Just recently, when typhoon Utor ripped through Hong Kong, everything, including their stock exchange, came to a close. And many people might remember the blackout that occurred almost exactly 10 years ago, affecting 55 million people throughout the northeast and Canada. Natural disasters and power losses can be catastrophic.

When these things occur and cities shut down, the ones that get through it best are often those that are best prepared. Learning from these disasters led many people to invest in good pumping systems, chippers, clutches, and other equipment. Standby diesel engines often provide the power when water treatment plants and the electric grid fail, and those engines rely on clutches.

Additionally, when hurricanes or typhoons hit and major flooding occurs, pumping systems properly remove the excess water. We have seen it countless times—municipalities calling us in the wake of a disaster, in need of pumps and clutches.

Furthermore, when strong winds cause falling trees (or even buildings), chippers are used for the cleanup, making the streets clear and safe. Rider trowels take care of the issues that arise from large concrete buildings, while plate tampers pack down the road surfaces and redo damaged asphalt. Accordingly, curbers fix the edging of sidewalks, making them safe for pedestrians following a big storm.

All of these are necessary to undo the damage done by these types of disasters. And while no one can truly predict what will come our way, being prepared can help you literally weather the storm.